Foreign Film Collection: Spotlight on France

The birth of cinema is said to have taken place in France with Auguste and Louis Lumière’s L’Arrivée d’un train en gare de La Ciotat in 1895. Since that time, France has been vital to the experience of cinema, with one period (French New Wave) during the 1950s-1960 being of vital importance to the growth of film.

The French New Wave was a term blanketed by critics for a group of French filmmakers during the late 1950s to the 1960s. Inspired by Italian Neorealism these creators broke from the conservative film-making style of their predecessors. Directors such as Goddard, Truffaut, Rohmer, and Chabrol began to make bold movies that experimented with techniques previously believed to be antiquated. Using portable equipment, direct sounds, and a film stock that required less light, allowed these pioneers to create movies in a documentary style. Combining discontinuous editing, long takes, combining subjective and objective realism, and adding ambiguity and unreliableness to the narration, allowed French New Wave to give a voice to the political upheaval that was occurring around them.

You can check out all of the French movies, including this year’s best picture winner, The Artist, below or continue reading after the jump for more resources of French Cinema.

eBooks

Campbell M. French New Wave. Harpenden, GBR.: Pocket Essentials; 2001

Crisp C. Genre, Myth and Convention in the French Cinema, 1929-1939. Bloomington, IN.: Indiana University Press; 2002.

Green N. Landscape of Loss: The National Past in Postwar French Cinema. Ewing, NJ.: Princeton University Press; 1999

Hayward S. French National Cinema. Florence, KY.: Routledge; 1993.

Higbee W, Leahy S. Studies in French Cinema: UK Perspectives 1985-2010. Bristol, GBR: Intellect Ltd.; 2011.

Neupert R.  Wisconsin Studies in Film History of the French New Wave Cinema. Chicago, Il: University of Wisconsin Press; 2009

Oscherwitz D. Past Forward: French Cinema and the Post-Colonial Heritage. Carbondale, Il.: Southern Illinois University Press; 2010

Powrie P, Rebillard, E. Pierre Batcheff and Stardom in the 1920s: French Cinema. Edinburgh, GBR: University of Edinburgh Press; 2009.

Articles

Abel R. Frame Stories for Writing the History of French Silent Cinema. Studies In French Cinema [serial online]. January 2002;2(1):5. Available from: Academic Search Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 17, 2012.

Bassan R, Courant G, Lebrat C, Noguez D. French experimental cinema: the richness of the 1970s. Studies In French Cinema [serial online]. October 2004;4(3):165-174. Available from: Academic Search Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 17, 2012.

Douchet J. The French new wave: Its influence and decline. Cineaste [serial online]. December 15, 1998;24(1):16. Available from: MasterFILE Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 17, 2012.

Higgins L. Old Waves, New Waves: French Cinema in 1974. Contemporary French & Francophone Studies [serial online]. December 2010;14(5):469-476. Available from: Academic Search Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 17, 2012.

Introduction. Cinema Journal [serial online]. Summer2010 2010;49(4):135-138. Available from: Academic Search Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 17, 2012.

Mary P. Cinematic Microcosm and Cultural Cosmologies: Elements of a Sociology of the New Wave. Cinema Journal [serial online]. July 15, 2010;49(4):159-166. Available from: OmniFile Full Text Select (H.W. Wilson), Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 17, 2012.

Neupert R. The New Wave’s American Reception. Cinema Journal [serial online]. July 15, 2010;49(4):139-145. Available from: OmniFile Full Text Select (H.W. Wilson), Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 17, 2012.

Sandhu S. Film as an act of love. New Statesman [serial online]. April 6, 2009;138(4943):44. Available from: MasterFILE Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 17, 2012.

Sandhu S. Film as an act of love. New Statesman [serial online]. April 6, 2009;138(4943):44. Available from: MasterFILE Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 17, 2012.

Schwartz V. Who Killed Brigitte Bardot? Perspectives on the New Wave at Fifty. Cinema Journal [serial online]. July 15, 2010;49(4):145-152. Available from: OmniFile Full Text Select (H.W. Wilson), Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 17, 2012.

Sellier G. French New Wave Cinema and the Legacy of Male Libertinage. Cinema Journal [serial online]. July 15, 2010;49(4):152-158. Available from: OmniFile Full Text Select (H.W. Wilson), Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 17, 2012.

Slavin D. French Cinema’s Other First Wave: Political and Racial Economies of Cinéma colonial, 1918 to 1934. Cinema Journal [serial online]. Fall97 1997;37(1):23. Available from: Academic Search Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 17, 2012.

SMOODIN E. GOING TO THE MOVIES IN PARIS, AROUND 1933. The Moving Image [serial online]. April 15, 2011;11(1):25-55. Available from: OmniFile Full Text Select (H.W. Wilson), Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 17, 2012.

Sorin C. The art of borrowing: French popular cinema before the New Wave. Studies In French Cinema [serial online]. January 2004;4(1):53-64. Available from: Academic Search Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 17, 2012.

Tapper D. Six of the best: French New Wave films. New Statesman [serial online]. April 6, 2009;138(4943):46. Available from: Academic Search Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 17, 2012.

Véray L, Krohn B. 1927: The Apotheosis of the French Historical Film? /. Film History [serial online]. January 2, 2005;17(2/3):334-351. Available from: OmniFile Full Text Select (H.W. Wilson), Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 17, 2012.

Vincendeau G. Introduction. Cinema Journal [serial online]. July 15, 2010;49(4):135-138. Available from: OmniFile Full Text Select (H.W. Wilson), Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 17, 2012.

 

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