Slavery & Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive

The PSC Library recently acquired access to a new online research database! The new database, Slavery & Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive, contains an enormous amount of documents about slavery, the slave trade, emancipation and abolition movements, not only in the United States, but throughout the world. According to the publisher, the archive contains over 12,000 books, 71 manuscript collections, Supreme Court records and briefs in 377 cases, along with chronologies, bibliographies, and more.

To get to the database, first go to the PSC Library website, then click on the “All Databases” link to go to the database list.
Click on "All Databases" on PSC website

Once you are on the databases list page, click on “S,” then on Slavery & Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive.
Click on S then on Slavery & Anti-Slavery

Once you are in the database, you have a number of options. You could simply type some keywords into the search box, or you could try an advanced search, which will give you options to limit results by publication date, source type, and other categories.

One of the more interesting ways to begin if you don’t have a particular topic already in mind is to start with the Research Tools section.
Research Tools section

Using the Research Tools link, you can learn about the the various collections that make up the databases, which tells you a bit more about their contents. For example, the image above shows the contents of one of the collections, namely documents concerning slavery and its abolition in the Danish West Indies (now known as the US Virgin Islands). If you have any questions about accessing this research database or using it, feel free to contact the PSC librarians!

Chicago Tribune and Chicago Tribune Historical Archive

While the PSC Library subscribes to the Chicago Tribune in print, you may not know that we also provide access to the Chicago Tribune and Chicago Tribune Historical Archive databases, where you can search for and read the text of articles going all the way back to 1849. This can be a great resource for research on topics involving local history or even of how national stories were reflected in the Midwest at the time. You can also just read the articles from today’s issue of the paper.

Although most articles available through the PSC Library can be found through OneSearch, the Chicago Tribune databases are some of the few exceptions, due to lack of cooperation from the companies holding the publication rights to the Tribune. Because of that, you’ll need to search for these articles separately. To enter either database, go to the library website and click on “Find,” then on “All Databases.”

find all databases

Then either click on C (for Chicago Tribune) or scroll down to the Cs in the alphabetical list:

 

azdatabasesc-1

At this point you have a choice between three options, either the Chicago Tribune database, which gives you access to articles from between 1985 and today, with a prominent link to today’s issue:

chitrib

Or you have the option of the Chicago Tribune Historical Archive for articles from 1849 to 1993:

chitribhist

Or you can search all Tribune combined content:

chitribcomb

Once you’ve found an article, you have the usual variety of tools available in most databases, for citing, emailing, and saving articles. As an example, here is the citation tool, which pops up when you click on the “Cite” link on the top-right of the screen.

proquestcite

You can then copy and paste that citation text to include in your assignment. Be aware that by default it uses APA 6th ed. citations. You can change that by using the drop down box for citation style, selecting your preferred style, and clicking on the “Change” button.

As always, your PSC librarians are happy to help you use the functions of any of these databases and tools and to help you search and critically think about information!

American Government reference database

One often-overlooked resource available through the PSC Library is the American Government reference database from publisher ABC-CLIO. The American Government database has a wealth of information on the American government, including encyclopedia-type article on a variety of topics, such as the powers of the different branches of government, the rights listed in the Constitution, and the everyday working of the federal government.

It also contains thousands of primary source materials, including speeches, letters, and political cartoons spanning hundreds of years, including important foundational documents like the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, Articles of Confederation, and resolutions of the Continental Congress, as well as important laws and court decisions.

To get to the American Government database, simply click here or go to the PSC Library website. At the PSC Library website, click on “Find” and then click on “All Databases.”

find all databases

That should open the A-Z Databases page. All you have to do now is click on “American Government.”

az-amgov

That will get you to the main American Government database page, which should look like this. If you are off-campus, you will need to log in using your PSC username and password.

amgov1

To access the reference articles about different topics, click on the “Topics” tab at the top-left of the page, which will send you here. Simply click on any of the topic links to read the full article.

amgov3

If you want to search for historical documents, images, letters, laws, etc., click on “Library,” which will send you to this page. You can search this using keywords, and you can also use the check-boxes under “Categories” to limit your results to specific kinds of documents or media.

amgov2

As always, if you have any questions don’t hesitate to Ask A Librarian, either in person at the reference desk or via our online chat/text service, which can be found at the library website.

EBSCO eBook Academic Collection

ACCESS EBSCO EBOOKS

As many of you know, the PSC Library offers access to a huge number of eBooks. While some of these are fiction, the vast majority are non-fiction titles that cover all the difference academic subjects. In fact, even though the library holds around 30,000 physical, printed books, we provide access to over 100,000 eBooks!

Recently, the library switched its main eBook provider, so I’d like to go over some of the basics of the new system. The quickest way to find eBooks is to use OneSearch on the main library website, just as you would to find other library resources.

OneSearch

Let’s say you searched for “ebola.” Your results page might look like this:

search results

As you can see, the results for this search include a print book for the first result. But in the third result, you see the title Ebola: Essentials, Response Efforts, and Prevention Issues. That book is an eBook, as indicated in the text under the book cover image. Also note the link that says “PDF Full Text.” If you click on that, you will be taken to a page where you can read the book in its entirety.

ebook reader page

Note the arrows in the middle of the page, which allow you to advance to the next page, or go back to a previous page.

ebook reader page arrows

You can also click on the Table of Contents link, expanding sections by clicking on the “+” boxes. By doing this, you can link to individual sections of the book. toc

If you would like to send a link to an eBook to your professor or other student, make sure to use the “Permalink” button at the top of the page and copy the URL that opens up when you click on it.

ebook reader permalink

From this page, you can also easily get a citation for the eBook. Simply click on the “Cite” button at top, scroll down to find the citation format used in your class, and copy and paste the citation into your document. Remember to double-check the citation for accuracy! While this tool is a great time-saver, it is not perfect, and is no substitute for an understanding of citation practices.

ebook reader cite

As you can see in the images above, there are also buttons that let you save and email pages. You can use these to remember important pages, and to send yourself a link to eBooks in which you have found useful information.

Finally, if you would simply like to browse the available eBooks by subject, click here, and you’ll be brought to this page:

ebook page

You can also get to this page from the main library website, by clicking on “Find,” in the menu, and then “All Databases.”

find all databases

On the page that opens, click on “E” and then “eBook Academic Collection.”

az ebooks

As with most PSC library resources, these eBooks are available off-campus. If you use OneSearch from off-campus, remember to click on the guest access link at the top of the screen, where you will be asked to enter your login information.

Feel free to ask a librarian if you have any questions, or if you’d like a tutorial on eBooks or other resources!

We can help you avoid plagiarism as you finish those final papers!

The end of the semester is nearly here, and along with dreams of sunny days and sleeping in is the reality of final papers. Writing a research paper is HARD, and we want to make sure you get all the help you need. Because of that, one of our librarians — Matthew Root — created a subject guide to help you through the ins and outs of plagiarism.

We know that you know what plagiarism is generally: passing off someone else’s work as your own. But did you know it’s also:

  • paraphrasing without citing?
  • using a paper you wrote in another class?

Matthew created this guide to answer questions you have about making sure you’re acknowledging someone else’s work in your own. And when you’re done writing your paper, check out our citation subject guide for the details of MLA and APA style.

Last: did you know the database helps you in creating a citation? When you’re in a record, click on the “Cite” link on the right side.

cite1

Scroll through to find the appropriate style for your class (e.g. APA or MLA), copy the citation, and paste it into your Work Cited list.

cite2

*IMPORTANT* You still need to make sure the citation matches the style you need, and all of the important stuff is included, but it cuts down on a lot of the work.

Good luck! You’re almost done!

Find Magazines, Newspapers, and Journals by title or subject with Publication Finder

As great as OneSearch is for keyword searches, it’s not necessarily straightforward how you can search for a specific magazine, newspaper, or journal title. If you just throw the title into the main OneSearch search box, the results usually don’t work out the way you would expect.

I can already hear you asking, “Why would I be searching for a specific publication title anyway?” Well, for one thing, the library offers online access to some of the most popular magazines, like National Geographic, Consumer Reports, and Newsweek, which you can read by issue, and many of them in PDF form with the original photos and layout. 

The same is true for newspapers. In particular, the Chicago Tribune is available, as are the Washington Post and New York Times. Anyone who has spent much time on the websites of those newspapers is probably familiar with the paywalls constantly asking you to log in or subscribe.

Luckily, you don’t have to! All of these publications are available through the library’s database subscriptions.

To search for a specific publication, all you need to do is use Publication Finder. You can get to Publication Finder in several ways. First, you can just click on the link on the library website that says “A-Z Journal List.”

library website

Alternately, you can click on “Find” in the menu bar, then click on “A-Z Journal List. ”

library website A-Z link

Finally, if you are in OneSearch already, you can get to Publication Finder by clicking on “Publications” at the top of the screen.

OneSearch failed search for Chicago Tribune

Once your’re in Publication Finder, just put the publication name into the search box and click the “Search” button. You’ll be taken to a page that lists all the access options available for the titles matching your search request. For example, a search for Chicago Tribune has 8 results, each covering a different span of time and different historical titles used by the Tribune. Click on the result link listing the time frame you are interested in. For example, if you are interested in reading today’s issue, click on the first link which says “Chicago Tribune (ProQuest) 12/04/1996 – present.”

pubfinder-trib-ed

This will take you to a different page, where you can select today’s issue, or a different issue available for that publication.

proquest-trib-ed

Another great thing about Publication Finder, which can be really useful if you are doing research on a topic, is to search for publication titles by subject, or even just use the “Browse By Discipline” links to see a list of everything that is available in a particular subject area.

pubfinder

If you have any questions about using Publication Finder, or if you can’t find a particular publication, contact the PSC library and we’ll be happy to help!

3-15-16 For Women’s History Month, what female historical figure do you want to learn more about?

3-15-16whatwomenFind information about these great historical female using the Library’s databases!

Jane Adams

http://ezproxy.prairiestate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ers&AN=88828086&site=eds-live

Sarah Winnemucca

http://ezproxy.prairiestate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ers&AN=88830301&site=eds-live

Nina Simone

http://ezproxy.prairiestate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ers&AN=89098605&site=eds-live

Mary Church Terrell

http://academic.eb.com/EBchecked/topic/588243/Mary-Eliza-Church-Terrell

Sally Hemings

http://ezproxy.prairiestate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ers&AN=88824778&site=eds-live

Dr. Francis Cress Welsing

http://ezproxy.prairiestate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&AN=48769993&site=eds-live

Shirley Chrisholm

http://ezproxy.prairiestate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ers&AN=88802188&site=eds-live

Assata Shakur

http://ezproxy.prairiestate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&AN=4050404&site=eds-live

Original Source Documents: Black Thought & Culture

The Black Thought and Culture database from Alexander Street Press is an impressive electronic resource that gathers together writings and information on a large number of important black thinkers and cultural figures. It includes major works by Frederick Douglass, Malcolm X, Marcus Garvey, Sammy Davis Jr., Ida B. Wells, Nikki Giovanni, Mary McLeod Bethune, Audre Lord, A. Philip Randolph, Amiri Baraka, Ralph Ellison, Langston Hughes, Henry Louis Gates Jr., Bayard Rustin, and many, many others.

A large amount of the material you can find in this particular database is previously unpublished or hard to find. Some of this includes the entire run of the Black Panther  newspaper, a transcript of the trial of Muhammad Ali, and many oral histories and interviews with musicians and artists.

If you want to search quickly for a particular author or topic, you can click can mouse over the “Find” menu and click on either “Sources” or “Authors.”

The Find - or advanced search screen

You can also get a year-by-year list of documents by mousing over “Browse” and then clicking on “Years.”

browse by historical events

You can also search by authors, keywords, and more using the this database’s advanced search, which you can find simply by mousing over “Search” and then clicking on “Advanced,” though you can certainly use the simple search if you don’t need all the extra options!

advanced search options

Be sure to ask your librarians if you have any questions about finding anything!

Try Some Classical Holiday Music

While it’s certainly not hard to find Christmas and other holiday music this time of year, some of it gets a little repetitive after a while. Why not try something a little different from the usual carols and popular renditions? Some of the great pieces of classical music were written for the events and celebrations of the season, so this is a perfect time to give a listen to them!

In order to get to this music, you can use a great site called Naxos Music Library.

 

Naxos Music Library logo

Naxos has tons of a fantastic classical music, over 1.7 million tracks, all available for streaming directly from a computer. Because the site is only available to students, faculty, and staff at Prairie State College, you will need to log in if you are listening from off-campus, just follow the on-screen directions.

To get started right away, just enter your keyword in the search bar up at the top and click search:

Naxos Music Library search bar

Then, when you’ve found something you want to listen to, click on the title. You’ll be presented with a list of tracks. Check off the ones you want to try, and then click on the play button on the left:

Naxos Music Library play instructions

Here are some interesting pieces to try out before you get searching on your own!

J.S. Bach – Christmas Oratorio

J.S. Bach - Christmas Oratorio

G.F. Handel – Judas Maccabaeus

G.F. Handel - Judas Maccabaeus

Anonymous (Performed by Sequentia)Verbum Patris Humanatur

Sequentia - Shining Light

 

How Did that Start: Halloween

Sign2015October is upon us and that means it’s that time when the leaves start turning red and gold, days get shorter, and nights get colder. It’s a time where brisk winds bring upon noises you’re not sure you’re really hearing, and where shadows dance around with your fears. With October comes one of the very best holidays, in my opinion, Halloween. Halloween is the one day of the year where everybody confronts their fears and fantasies by dressing up in costumes, sneaking off into the night, and performing mischief. It is also a time where mother nature sets the perfect mood for you to sit down with a scary book or horror film. Likewise, kids get to experience the ultimate of sugar rushes as they go door-to-door collecting gumballs, candies, and gelled popcorn creations. Like most holidays, Halloween did not just spring to life in America; it came to us through thousands of years of growth and change, passing from culture to culture, from the Ancient Irish to the Roman Empire and several others all putting their stamp on it.

For the most part, Halloween was believed to start as part of the Celtic religion’s New Year celebration, Samhain, which occurred on November 1st. It was on the day before Samhain, that the Celtic people believed the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead became paper thin and blurred. During this time the ghosts of the dead could return and once again walk the face of the earth. To ward off the spirits, Druids would build huge sacred bonfires and offer sacrifices of corn and animals to the deities. Citizens, likewise, would dress in costumes of animal heads and skins to hide themselves from the spirits. People would also burn effigies depicting their fears, and since the reality boundary was so thin, they felt that it was a prime time for fortune-telling.

In 43 AD, the Roman Empire finished conquering the lands of the Celtic people. Always good for taking someone else’s traditions and combining them with their own, Rome, decided to merge Samhain with two of their own festivals. The first was called Feralia, which usually occurred mid-October. Romans usually took this day to formally commemorate the passing of the dead. The other festival they merged Samhain with was Pomona, a day dedicated to the honor of the goddess of fruits and trees (it is widely believed that the tradition of bobbing for apples on Halloween came from Roman tradition).

When the Roman Empire fell, the holiday that would eventually come to be known as Halloween, once again evolved, this time thanks to the Roman Catholic Church. Early on in the Church’s history they started a day in mid-October to celebrate the saints and martyr’s. Eventually that celebration would move to November 1st and become known as All Saints’ Day; a day to honor the dead. The day before (October 31st) would come to be known as All Hallows’ Eve, and similar to Samhain, people would celebrate with bonfires and costumes. In fact, in France during the 14th and 15th centuries, the tradition of dressing up, evolved into a reenactment of a custom called the Danse Macabre (The Dance of Death) which started during the plague known as Black Death, wherein party-goers would dress up so that demons could not tell who they were.

In the mid-19th century, Halloween, came to America with British and Irish immigrants. One tradition had the adults of families go door to door asking for food or money and people gave gifts because it was thought to be good luck and kept spirits from performing mischief. Later in the early to middle part of the 20th century, Halloween became the secular community-based holiday that we know today, where kids go door-to-door asking for treats and threatening tricks, families display Jack ‘O Lanterns, and both grownups and children dress up in costume and attend parties and dances.

In celebration of the spirit of Halloween, you can find frightful, horrifying, and haunting tales both true and fictitious on the Monthly Book Display.