Slavery & Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive

The PSC Library recently acquired access to a new online research database! The new database, Slavery & Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive, contains an enormous amount of documents about slavery, the slave trade, emancipation and abolition movements, not only in the United States, but throughout the world. According to the publisher, the archive contains over 12,000 books, 71 manuscript collections, Supreme Court records and briefs in 377 cases, along with chronologies, bibliographies, and more.

To get to the database, first go to the PSC Library website, then click on the “All Databases” link to go to the database list.
Click on "All Databases" on PSC website

Once you are on the databases list page, click on “S,” then on Slavery & Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive.
Click on S then on Slavery & Anti-Slavery

Once you are in the database, you have a number of options. You could simply type some keywords into the search box, or you could try an advanced search, which will give you options to limit results by publication date, source type, and other categories.

One of the more interesting ways to begin if you don’t have a particular topic already in mind is to start with the Research Tools section.
Research Tools section

Using the Research Tools link, you can learn about the the various collections that make up the databases, which tells you a bit more about their contents. For example, the image above shows the contents of one of the collections, namely documents concerning slavery and its abolition in the Danish West Indies (now known as the US Virgin Islands). If you have any questions about accessing this research database or using it, feel free to contact the PSC librarians!

Martin Luther King, Jr: Library Resources for MLK Day

Check out some of the resources you can find on Martin Luther King, Jr. at the Prairie State College Library!

Books

DVDs

Articles, Speeches, and Letters

Streaming Media

This week in 1871: the Great Chicago Fire

chicagofire

  Image: Library of Congress, LCCN 92506070

October 8-10, 1871: Thanks to a combination of very dry conditions, a predominance of wooden buildings, and a smaller fire from the previous day which compromised the efficacy of firefighters and equipment, what would be known as the Great Chicago Fire ruined about a third of the city. We might never know for sure if Mrs. O’Leary’s cow was to blame for the blaze, but check out these four great resources from the PSC Library and beyond to learn more about this important event in Chicago history!

  1. Chicago Tribune Historical Archive

Primary sources were created by individuals during the time of the historical event, rather than by later researchers. Newspapers are a great example of a primary source, and the PSC Library has digital access to the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

One way to find articles created around the time of the Great Chicago Fire is to look at the news articles published around October 8-10, 1871. To do this, first find the archive that covers the time period of interest. In this case, since we are searching for articles created during 1871, click on the fifth archive in the list, “Chicago Tribune (1860-1872).” Once there, you have the option to search within the publication or to browse specific dates.

Continue reading “This week in 1871: the Great Chicago Fire”

Dr. Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress

On September 14, Dr. Carla Hayden was sworn in as the 14th librarian of Congress. aptopixlibrarianofcongress-7b2acThe selection of Dr. Hayden is a landmark appointment; she is the first woman and the first African-American to head the Library of Congress. In addition, Hayden is also only the third career librarian to serve as Librarian of Congress, which has previously been held by historians or other scholars. The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library with over 160,000,000 items.

Dr. Hayden grew up in Chicago, attending Roosevelt University and then the University of Chicago Graduate School Library. Her first position out of library school was with the Museum of Science and Industry, where she meet Michelle and Barack Obama. In 1991, Dr. Hayden became second-in-command at the Chicago Public Library. Then in 1993, she was selected as director of the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, Maryland. As director, Hayden was selected as Librarian of the Year by the Library Journal, she served as president of the American Librarian Association, and received national praise for keeping the library open during  riots in Baltimore after Freddie Gray’s arrest.

Dr. Hayden has been a champion of “Equity of Access” through her entire career. She fought against the Bush Administration and the PATRIOT Act, earning significant praise. As Librarian of Congress, Dr. Hayden has vowed to digitize the Library of Congress’s collection, providing equal access to our nation’s literary and information resources.

In her nomination address, Dr. Hayden said, “I’ve talked for years and cited how slaves were forbidden to read, you could get your hand chopped off, or people who taught slaves to read were punished, that’s Fredrick Douglass’s thing. So to have an African American heading up the world’s largest library is not quite an oxymoron, but it speaks to the history.”

Follow Dr. Carla Hayden on Twitter.

 

 

References

Gross, Daniel. “Carla Hayden Takes Charge of World’s Largest Library.” September 20, 2016. Accessed September 30, 2016. http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/carla-hayden-takes-charge-of-the-worlds-largest-library.

St. Lifer, Evan, and Michael Rogers. “Hayden leaves Chicago PL to head Enoch Pratt Free Lib.” Library Journal 118, no. 10 (June 1993): 19.Academic Search Complete, EBSCOhost (accessed September 30, 2016).

Woods, Baynard. “Carla Hayden: New Librarian of Congress Makes History, with an Eye on the Future.” The Guardian. September 15, 2016. Accessed September 30, 2016. https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/sep/15/carla-hayden-librarian-congress-first-woman-african-american-post-interview.

Constitution & Citizenship Day

Constitution & Citizenship Day is a federal observance of the adoption of the United States Constitution. Introduced in 2004 by West Virginia Senator Robert Byrd, the day is set aside for the promotion of civic education on the principal document of our nation. Senator Byrd believed it was imperative that all people in the United States have a fundamental understanding of the document that guarantees our freedoms. Moreover, it is also an opportunity to reflect how our nation has struggled with expanding full and equal rights to all people. On the anniversary of the signing the Constitution, September 17, 1787, all publicly funded schools are mandated to teach about the Constitution.

The Prairie State Library is excited to host a Constitution & Citizenship Day event on Thursday, September 15th from 12:30 to 1:45. The activities will include a lecture by Professor Andrew Schott titled “‘This Process Affords a Moral Certainty’ The Election of the U.S. President” and a “Citizenship Game Show” hosted by Professor Jennifer Eick-Magan.

Need more information? Want to impress your friends or enemies during the Game Show? Bone up on your knowledge of the U.S. Constitution by using PSC Library’s Guide to Constitution & Citizenship Day.

 

References:

Krache, Donna. “Constitution Day Ushers in Mandate to Teach the Constitution.” CNN. September 16, 2005. Accessed September 02, 2016. http://www.cnn.com/2005/EDUCATION/09/16/constitution.day/.

OBAMA, BARACK. “Proclamation 9323–Constitution Day and Citizenship Day, Constitution Week, 2015.” Daily Compilation Of Presidential Documents (September 16, 2015): 1. Points of View Reference Center, EBSCOhost (accessed September 2, 2016).

Cahokia Mounds

Looking for a weekend trip? Want to visit a World Heritage site? How about the third largest pyramid base in the world? You do not even have to leave Illinois.

01-cahokia-central-plaza-615
Cahokia Central Plaza

Cahokia Mounds, located in what is now St. Clair County, Illinois, was the largest pre-Columbian indigenous city north of Mexico. Built where the Missouri River feeds into the Mississippi, the city was a principal trade hub that connected peoples and goods from Canada to Appalachia to Mexico. At its most populated, Cahokia reached 40,000 inhabitants, a population not matched in the U.S. until the late 18th century. At the time, approximately 1,100 C.E., it was one of the most populated cities in the world, greater than major European cities like London and Paris.

Today, Cahokia stands as a testament to the sophistication of indigenous people. A UNESCO World Heritage site, the settlement complex is an architectural marvel. Covering over 6.5 square miles, Cahokia contains 120 earthen mounds, with additional satellite sites, serving religious, political, and social purposes. Located in a flood plain, the site had to be drained and many tons of rock and soil had to be moved to construct the plazas and mounds. The principal structure, Monk’s Mound covers over an immense 14 acres, making it the largest earthen structure and the third largest pyramid base in the world, rivaled only by the Sun Pyramid in Teotihuacán and the Great Pyramid in Cholula, Mexico.

Much is left to be discovered about Cahokia. An active archaeological site, researchers are re-discovering cultural, economic, social, and religious artifacts. We are constantly expanding our understanding of the land’s first people.

What can you discover?

References

Barnes, Ian. The Historical Atlas of Native Americans. Edison, N.J. : Chartwell Books, 2009.

Johnson, Michael, and Richard Hook. Encyclopedia of Native Tribes of North America. Buffalo, New York : Firefly Books Inc., 2014.

Kehoe, Alice Beck. “Cahokia, the Great City.” OAH Magazine Of History 27, no. 4 (October 2013): 17. MasterFILE Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed July 5, 2016).

 

History in and Around Chicago!

Learn more about Chicago and Illinois history over the summer by checking out a book and visiting some of our cultural institutions.For its 2015-2016 season, the Chicago Public Library Foundation’s One Book, One Chicago, selected Thomas Dyja’s book, The Third Coast, which offers a detailed account of Chicago history. His narrative of Chicago includes many historical landmarks that we can still visit today. Themes included in the book are politics (of course!), architecture, urban planning, the arts, and race. The Chicago Public Library hosts many events during the One Book season.

The 2015-2016 season is now over, but the 2016-2017 season is forthcoming. No matter, The Third Coast would make a great summer read!

And in between reading, make plans to visit some of these local institutions: The Pullman State Historical Site , DuSable Museum  , National Museum of Mexican Art, and Heritage Museum of Asian Art (reopening late summer of 2016.)

Below is just a small sample of titles in the Prairie State College Library collection. So stop by to check out some of these great Chicagoland stories (fiction and non-fiction included!), and ask about our college archives!

Native American and Indigenous Studies

Indigenous and Native peoples include aboriginal people of Australia, South America, and Canada. This post highlights the resources that are available in the Prairie State College Library collection, which mainly focus on Northern and some Southern American indigenous peoples.

Beginning in the 1960s, academic programs in Native American and Indigenous studies blossomed from the Native need for self-esteem and respect in North American societies. One of the first programs in American Indian Studies began at the University of Minnesota in 1964 (Morrison, 1997, p.112). And these programs have expanded well into the 21 century, with some American Indian community colleges being established over the years.In Peace, Power, Righteousness: An Indigenous Mainfesto, Taiaiake Alfred defines the terms used to identify indigenous peoples saying “Indian” (…is a legal term still in use by some indigenous people in North America), “Native” (in reference to the racial and cultural distinctiveness of individuals, and to distinguish our communities from those of the mainstream society, “American Indian” (in common use and a legal-political category in the United States), “Aboriginal” (a legal category in Canada, and “indigenous” (in global contexts and to emphasize natural, tribal, and traditional characteristics of various peoples.)” (p.23). One learns that there is a distinction in tribal affiliation as well as identity. Further, there are different ways of knowing and being in native and indigenous contexts from which we can all learn. These are some of the complexities and distinctions that one can encounter by reading the literature in Native American and Indigenous studies.

Want to learn more? Stop by the library and check out one of these resources!

Sources:
Alfred, G. R. (2009). Peace, power, righteousness: An indigenous manifesto. Oxford University Press, USA.
Morrison, D. A. (Ed.). (1997). American Indian studies: An interdisciplinary approach to contemporary issues. Peter Lang Pub Incorporated.

3-15-16 For Women’s History Month, what female historical figure do you want to learn more about?

3-15-16whatwomenFind information about these great historical female using the Library’s databases!

Jane Adams

http://ezproxy.prairiestate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ers&AN=88828086&site=eds-live

Sarah Winnemucca

http://ezproxy.prairiestate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ers&AN=88830301&site=eds-live

Nina Simone

http://ezproxy.prairiestate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ers&AN=89098605&site=eds-live

Mary Church Terrell

http://academic.eb.com/EBchecked/topic/588243/Mary-Eliza-Church-Terrell

Sally Hemings

http://ezproxy.prairiestate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ers&AN=88824778&site=eds-live

Dr. Francis Cress Welsing

http://ezproxy.prairiestate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&AN=48769993&site=eds-live

Shirley Chrisholm

http://ezproxy.prairiestate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ers&AN=88802188&site=eds-live

Assata Shakur

http://ezproxy.prairiestate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&AN=4050404&site=eds-live

Women’s History Month: American Indian and Indigenous Women

Stories of American Indian women Pocahontas and Sacagawea are familiar parts of elementary history education. However, their history has been sanitized, romanticized, and even animated by Disney.

Their current lives are often made invisible.
The truth is that many American Indian and Indigenous women were warriors and explorers.  And they have been activists and advocates for their people. Women such as Anacaona who was a Taino (indigenous) woman from the land that is now Haiti, Sarah Winnemucca whose name was Thocmentony–named after a flower–and was a member of a Northern Paiute tribe in Nevada, and Waziyatawin ,  a Dakota, member of a Minnesota tribe, and a professor activist at the University of Victoria in British Columbia.
Anacaona became a chief after the passing of one of her brothers, and represented her people to the Spanish. One could say that she had a close relationship with the Spanish. Ultimately, they betrayed her trust, and executed her by hanging.
Sarah Winnemucca wrote an autobiography that serves as an historical narrative of her people and includes stories about their first contact with Europeans.

Waziyatawin, a professor of Indigenous history, has been an outspoken activist and advocate for the Dakota people, and for all other indigenous people.

If you want to learn more about inspiring American Indian and Indigenous women, check out some resources in the Prairie State College Library!
Sources: