Favorite Super Bowl snack food?


blackboard superbowl snack food

Congratulations to the Philadelphia Eagles in last night’s upset game!  And, just a reminder– PSC’s Fitness Center is available to you after you’ve eaten all that delicious snack food.

Next blackboard question: “What do you want to get this year for Valentine’s Day?” Stop by the library to write your response and to see what others have to say!


Oh no, tax season is here!

Today is the first day you can file your return with the IRS, and the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) and the Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) programs offer free tax help for taxpayers who qualify. Find a provider near you!

You can file your federal tax return for free if you made under $66,000 last year. Click here to access IRS Free File software and fillable forms.

Or, if you’d rather do your return on paper, come to the Prairie State College Library to download and print the tax forms you need. Printouts are ten cents a page.

Federal tax forms

Illinois tax forms

Indiana tax forms

Urban Fiction


Urban Fiction, also known as Urban Literature, Street Fiction, Gangsta Lit, Ghetto Lit, or Hip-Hop Fiction, is a relatively new but fast growing genre in the world of literature. Urban fiction excels in its compelling portrayals of modern characters dealing with the gritty realities of life on the urban streets. Its stories and characters help expose problems facing the black community. According to popular Urban Fiction author Teri Woods:

“The content is shedding light on a people who were, for many years, swept under the rug. It’s showing you its world, it’s giving you that whole lifestyle of drug infestation and poverty, which are the two biggest problems in black America. If you want to sweep that exposure under the rug and pretend it doesn’t exist, then it’s not going to fix the problem.”

The gritty reality and topics of this genre are what make it popular. According to Kevin Johnson, a Harlem, New York street vendor, “They are popular because they reflect the reality of the black experience, readers identify themselves with the characters and they can relate to those stories.” In addition to its intense and abrasive story lines, attention grabbing titles and ‘eye popping’ cover art also help in getting urban fiction books selected by patrons.

At PSC we are growing our collection of Urban Fiction novels. Stop by the library to check out our Urban Fiction display and the rest of our collection!

PSC Library Joins OverDrive!


OverDrive is now live for the Prairie State College Community! OverDrive allows users access to the library’s collection of popular fiction and non-fiction eBooks and audiobooks.

Accessing OverDrive is simple! You can either type in the link prairiestate.overdrive.com or, find it on the library’s website, under the ‘All Databases’ icon (http://prairiestate.libguides.com/az.php?a=o):



The next step is to Sign In. All you  need to sign in is your library card number, which can be found on your PSC ID. *Note: If you have not already registered your ID card at the library, you will need to do so before using OverDrive.*

sample ID card with highlight 2


After you are signed in, you can browse through the collection by looking at some of the site’s featured titles, by subject, or by collection. If you already know what you are looking for, you may search using the search bar on the top, right-hand corner.


In addition to its basic search features, OverDrive has features that can help keep you organized! By clicking on the book icon, you will be directed to a page that gives you different options to select from.


After clicking on the books icon, you will be directed to the page below.


This page can help you keep track of your loans, items you have added to your Wish List, titles you have rated, your recommendations, and allows you to view your loan history.


If you have any questions or would like further information on OverDrive, please do not hesitate to contact the library!



Our Right to Read- Banned Books Week

Banned Books Week: Our right to read, September 24-30, 2017

The American Library Association’s annual Banned Books Week will begin on the week of September 24. This year’s theme, “Our Right to Read,” is aimed at putting emphasis on our First Amendment Right, which ensures our right to read.

According to the American Library Association’s Office of Intellectual Freedom, there was a 17% increase in book censorship complaints in 2016. This statistic is alarming, as it is the right of each American to make their own intellectual decisions and choose what they would like to read.

When a library or university/college is prohibited from providing certain books or materials, they are hindering an individual or community’s intellectual freedom. It is important to remember that the term “offensive” is subjective- what may be offensive to you may be perfectly acceptable to one of your peers. Because of this, these materials should be made available (if the library so chooses) and individuals should be granted their right to make their decision.

Visit: bannedbooksweek.org for more information!

International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples- August 9


On August 9, the United Nations celebrates the International Day of the Worlds Indigenous Peoples. Indigenous peoples are arguably one of the most disadvantaged and vulnerable groups of people in the world. Throughout history, the rights of indigenous peoples have always been violated. To fight against this oppression, indigenous peoples from around the world stand together to fight against their common problems and contest for their rights. The theme for this year’s International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples is their tenth year anniversary. On September 13, 2007, the General Assembly adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

For more information on how to get involved, visit: http://www.un.org/en/events/indigenousday/index.shtml

Nelson Mandela Day- July 18!


July 18 is marked on our calendars as Nelson Mandela Day. On July 18, 2009, the United Nations unanimously voted to recognize the day-Mandela’s birthday- as a time to commemorate the lifelong service Mandela dedicated to South Africa and the world. This day calls on us to help make our communities and the world a better place.

To find out more out about what you can do to celebrate Mandela Day, visit its website at: https://www.mandeladay.com/pages/what-can-i-do

Also, use the hashtag #ActionAgainstPoverty to share or see good deeds being done in your community.

Slavery & Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive

The PSC Library recently acquired access to a new online research database! The new database, Slavery & Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive, contains an enormous amount of documents about slavery, the slave trade, emancipation and abolition movements, not only in the United States, but throughout the world. According to the publisher, the archive contains over 12,000 books, 71 manuscript collections, Supreme Court records and briefs in 377 cases, along with chronologies, bibliographies, and more.

To get to the database, first go to the PSC Library website, then click on the “All Databases” link to go to the database list.
Click on "All Databases" on PSC website

Once you are on the databases list page, click on “S,” then on Slavery & Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive.
Click on S then on Slavery & Anti-Slavery

Once you are in the database, you have a number of options. You could simply type some keywords into the search box, or you could try an advanced search, which will give you options to limit results by publication date, source type, and other categories.

One of the more interesting ways to begin if you don’t have a particular topic already in mind is to start with the Research Tools section.
Research Tools section

Using the Research Tools link, you can learn about the the various collections that make up the databases, which tells you a bit more about their contents. For example, the image above shows the contents of one of the collections, namely documents concerning slavery and its abolition in the Danish West Indies (now known as the US Virgin Islands). If you have any questions about accessing this research database or using it, feel free to contact the PSC librarians!