Book of the Month | April | Spring 2018

April’s Book of the Month is The Invisible Life of Euridice Gusmao.

invisible life

Book description: “The tale of two sisters who, surrounded by a cast of unforgettable characters, assert their independence and courageously carve a path of their own in 1940s Rio de Janeiro.”

The Invisible Life of Euridice Gusmao is available for checkout at the library. If you read it, let us know! Follow the link for a printer-friendly booklist with readalike books and authors. Happy reading!

 

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Book of the Month | March | Spring 2018

It’s spring break time here at Prairie State, and time to catch up on that most elusive of pastimes for busy college students– reading for pleasure!

Our recommended read for March is Jacqueline Woodson’s Another Brooklyn.

woodson-another-brooklyn

Book description: “August returns to Brooklyn to bury her father, and a chance encounter with a friend in her old neighborhood prompts a flood of memories from her youth. Her memories explore what it was like to be an African-American girl (and teen) in the 1970s, what possibilities existed — and what challenges. This tale of friendship, love, and loss cuts back and forth through time.” — Description by Shauna Griffin. 

Another Brooklyn is a 2016 New York Times Notable Book, a Booklist Editor’s Choice for adult and teen fiction, a recipient of the Black Caucus of the ALA’s award for fiction, and a 2016 National Book Award finalist. Another Brooklyn may be checked out from the Prairie State College Library.

If you enjoyed Another Brooklyn, let us know! We also have some readalikes for you:

Brown Girl Dreaming, by Jacqueline Woodson  (JUV WOO)

Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward (FIC WAR)

Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin (FIC BAL)

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro (FIC ISH)

(Click here for a printer-friendly version of this page.)

We hope you are enjoying your time off, but you can still pop in to the library from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. during Spring Break, just in case you missed us. Rest up, rejuvenate and read something that’s not part of an assignment. 🙂

Book of the Month| February | Spring 2018

This month’s recommended read is Louise Erdrich’s Future Home of the Living God.

future

Ian Stade of LibraryReads provides a summary: “From the author of the National Book award-winning novel The Round House comes an exploration into the possibility of evolution reversing and is told from the perspective of a pregnant woman who is writing a journal to her unborn child. Along the way we meet her adoptive parents, her birth mother, and she reports on society unraveling and detaining pregnant women. Erdrich provides compelling characters and a strong storyline about a near future in this piece of innovative dystopian fiction.”

Or, as the New York Times puts it, ‘What if evolution stopped, and then start running backward?”

Click here to read an interview of Louise Erdrich by Margot Atwood, author of A Handmaid’s Tale. If you like this title, we definitely suggest reading (or re-reading) this modern dystopian classic.

Other readalike authors to try: P.D. James, Sherman Alexie, Isabel Allende, Ian McEwan, Megan Hunter

If you like Future Home of the Living God, you may also like the following three books available for checkout:

The End We Start From by Megan Hunter

Gather the Daughters by Jennie Melamed

The Unkindness of Ghosts by Rivers Solmon

Click here to download our flyer with a list of readalike books and authors.

Happy Reading!

Women’s History Month: American Indian and Indigenous Women

Stories of American Indian women Pocahontas and Sacagawea are familiar parts of elementary history education. However, their history has been sanitized, romanticized, and even animated by Disney.

Their current lives are often made invisible.
The truth is that many American Indian and Indigenous women were warriors and explorers.  And they have been activists and advocates for their people. Women such as Anacaona who was a Taino (indigenous) woman from the land that is now Haiti, Sarah Winnemucca whose name was Thocmentony–named after a flower–and was a member of a Northern Paiute tribe in Nevada, and Waziyatawin ,  a Dakota, member of a Minnesota tribe, and a professor activist at the University of Victoria in British Columbia.
Anacaona became a chief after the passing of one of her brothers, and represented her people to the Spanish. One could say that she had a close relationship with the Spanish. Ultimately, they betrayed her trust, and executed her by hanging.
Sarah Winnemucca wrote an autobiography that serves as an historical narrative of her people and includes stories about their first contact with Europeans.

Waziyatawin, a professor of Indigenous history, has been an outspoken activist and advocate for the Dakota people, and for all other indigenous people.

If you want to learn more about inspiring American Indian and Indigenous women, check out some resources in the Prairie State College Library!
Sources: