(Armchair) travel

travel

Photo credit: Matt; shared under the Creative Commons license

With February–arguably the Chicago area’s dreariest month–at a close and spring break just around the corner, it’s tempting to think about a change of scenery.  If a trip out of town isn’t on your schedule this break, you can still escape…with a book!

Check out these titles that are particularly evocative of a time and a place. The location and time period have been listed, but click on the book cover to see the full catalog description. Some are e-books, so you can even read them without coming to campus over the break. Happy travels!

west-africa-travel
Africa, 1897
goldfinch
New York, present day
shadow-of-the-wind
Spain, 1945
heroes-of-the-frontier
Alaska, present day
wild
Pacific Northwest, 1990s
my-life-in-france
France, 1940s-1950s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fair Use Week

It’s Fair Use Week. Libraries, universities, artists, and journalists around the world are rejoicing what Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg called a “First Amendment Safeguard.”

To quote fairuse.org, “Fair use and fair dealing are essential limitations and exceptions to copyright, allowing the use of copyrighted materials without permission from the copyright holder under certain circumstances…facilitat[ing] balance in copyright law, promoting further progress and accommodating freedom of speech and expression.”

Fair use is essential in the function of schools and universities. Instructors are able to show videos in class, distribute articles to students, and have imagines in slides. This right to distribute copyrighted material. Check out the Prairie State College Library’s LibGuide on Fair Use for more information.

However, the right of fair use extends beyond academia and is an essential factor in journalism and the arts.

If it wasn’t for the principles of fair use, journalism and news reporting would be extremely difficult. Organizations like CNN, The Washington Post, Democratic Underground, and even The Daily Show are able to report on current stories and use copyrighted material to support these stories because it is considered fair use. ESPN, and other sports websites, would have to obtain permission and possibly pay money before they used team logos.

nba
espn.com 02/22/2017

For the arts, fair use protections encourage artists to experiment with current media. Pieces of art that are transformative and do not infringe on the commercial rights of the rights holder, qualify as fair use. Many musicians are experimenting with this form of art.

8 Books to Read for New and Upcoming TV Shows

Want to be ahead of the curve? Check out these books from the Library before they become TV shows!

The Handmaid’s Tale

The Show

Hulu | April 26, 2017 | Read up on it

The Book

The Handmaid’s Tale

by Margaret Atwood

FIC ATW

Offred is a Handmaid in the Republic of Gilead. She may leave the home of the Commander and his wife once a day to walk to food markets whose signs are now pictures instead of words because women are no longer allowed to read. She must lie on her back once a month and pray that the Commander makes her pregnant, because in an age of declining births, Offred and the other Handmaids are valued only if their ovaries are viable.

Offred can remember the days before, when she lived and made love with her husband Luke; when she played with and protected her daughter; when she had a job, money of her own, and access to knowledge. But all of that is gone now….


American Gods

The Show

Starz | April 2017 | Read up on it

The Book

American Gods

by Neil Gaiman

FIC GAI

Released from prison, Shadow finds his world turned upside down. His wife has been killed; a mysterious stranger offers him a job. But Mr. Wednesday, who knows more about Shadow than is possible, warns that a storm is coming — a battle for the very soul of America . . . and they are in its direct path. Continue reading “8 Books to Read for New and Upcoming TV Shows”

PSC’s Most Read Books of 2016

Here are the books most checked out or read online at Prairie State College in 2016!

Maybe it’s no surprise given the popularity of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s musical, Hamilton, but Hamilton by Ron Chernow was tied for most number of check-outs, along with Cambodge: The Cultivation of a Nation, 1860-1945, by Penny Edwards.

Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow
Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow
Cambodge: The Cultivation of a Nation, 1860-1945 by Penny Edwards
Cambodge by Penny Edwards

Following on those two, we have next group of highly-read books, a nice mix of fiction and non-fiction.

Dead Wake by Erik Larson
Dead Wake by Erik Larson
Night by Elie Wiesel
Night by Elie Wiesel
The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah
The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah
The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen
The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen
Hip Hop Africa by Eric S. Charry
Hip Hop Africa by Eric S. Charry
Fundamentals of Nursing Test Success
Fundamentals of Nursing Test Success
The Great Barrier Reef: Biology, Environment and Management
The Great Barrier Reef: Biology, Environment and Management
The Maritime Heritage of the Cayman Islands by Roger C. Smith
The Maritime Heritage of the Cayman Islands by Roger C. Smith
A Game of Thrones, Book 1, by George R.R. Martin
A Game of Thrones, Book 1, by George R.R. Martin

Just behind those titles in popularity come our next batch!

A Stolen Life: A Memoir by Jaycee Dugard
A Stolen Life: A Memoir by Jaycee Dugard
The Book of Enoch by R.H Charles
The Book of Enoch by R.H Charles
The New Public Health by Theodore H. Tulchinsky
The New Public Health by Theodore H. Tulchinsky
Kindred by Octavia E. Butler
Kindred by Octavia E. Butler
https://catalog.swanlibraries.net/client/en_US/pcs/search/detailnonmodal/ent:$002f$002fSD_ILS$002f0$002fSD_ILS:1224788/one
The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin
Alcatraz--The History of an Island Prison by Donna Van Raaphorst
Alcatraz–The History of an Island Prison by Donna Van Raaphorst

Civic engagement

dc

Photo credit: BKL, c/o www.travelmag.com, shared under the Creative Commons license

A new presidential administration is underway. Regardless of your political beliefs, it’s a good time to remember that as U.S. citizens, we have the duty and the right to speak up about issues we care about.

If you’re new to the civic process in general, our Political Science Guide includes some great resources to familiarize yourself with government processes, including books and websites.

Here are some ways to stay connected and to help you voice concerns:

  • Join the email list for a nonprofit organization that represents a cause you care about.
  • National Public Radio (NPR) has a new show, titled Indivisible, in which listeners with differing political views are encouraged to call in and discuss concerns. In the Chicago area, the NPR station is 91.5 FM.
  • White House Petitions are online petitions that you can start or sign. The White House is required to address petitions that reach at least 100,000 signatures.
  • Regulations.gov is an online database of proposed changes or additions to regulations. The government is required to review and consider submissions on this site, so speak up!
  • Contact your Senator or Representative. This site has some tips on the different methods of contact, and allows you to find your elected officials by entering your zip code.

Like any organization, the government needs to know what’s working (or not) for its people. By staying informed and providing feedback, YOU can help shape the direction of our nation!